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5.4  Vorbereitete Lernsequenzen
127
Übernommen und gekürzt von:
Exploring numbers that yield squares and rectangles
When I give this lesson during an artist-in-residency presentation,
the children are seated in twos or fours and supplied with 2-4
colors to be shared. I am at the front of the room with my overhead
projector and some felt tip colored markers to use on a
transparency showing the square grid.
I ask the children to color in one of the smallest squares on the
grid. I tell them they can put that square anywhere they like on the
paper. I say, 
"Now that's a 1-square square. Let's take another color marker
and color in a bigger square. We don't want it to touch our 1-
square square. How many squares must we color in to make a
bigger square? Don't tell me; show me."
I walk around and look at the squares that are colored in. I will
see squares that have 4 squares colored in, 9 squares, 16, etc. I
will also see rectangles. 
"Boys and girls, let's make the squares in size order. After the 1-
square square, what is the next size square?"
To facilitate the exploration of 'square numbers' I will use poker
chips on the overhead projector and arrange 4 of them 'to make a
square'. I will ask a student to come up to the overhead and add
poker chips to make the 4-square into a bigger square. Before the
student does each successive size, I will ask, "how many must
we add?"
On the blackboard, two charts are being built as we go along:
Sequence
# of Squares
Add Yields
alternating
of Squares
in the Square
Squares
odd and even #s
1st square
1-sq. square
3
even
2nd square
4-sq. square
5
odd
3rd square
9-sq. square
7
even
4th square
16-sq. square
9
odd
5th square
25-sq. square
etc.
Thus there are patterns of odd and even to help us know if the
number of unit squares we think must be added to form a larger
composite square is right, and the nth row of the 'Add Squares'
Beispiel 5-24
Geometrie durch Kunst?
#  wird häufig für ›Nummer‹
bzw. ›Anzahl‹ verwendet